I get inside your head.
You get inside mine.

Where they
intersect, something
unexpected and fresh happens.

This is the heightened act of relating.

Alan Alda, an actor and writer known widely for his role in the hit TV series M*A*S*H, has redefined himself in the past two decades as an advocate for communication. For 11 years Alda hosted Scientific American Frontiers, a PBS series in which he interviewed hundreds of scientists about their research. Alda realized that his conversational approach of these interviews generated a spontaneous and vivid presentation of their work.

Many of the secrets of successful performers can be applied by entrepreneurs to increase their own creativity, as well as the pace of innovation within their organizations. By using a few tips of the trade from the arts, leaders can help bring their companies out from behind the curtain and into the spotlight.

— “7 Ideas About Business Innovation From . . . Would You Believe, the Performing Arts”

October 2016

Using the innovative Alda Method™ based on improvisation we prepare women to thrive in the workplace by communicating with confidence.

I am so much more aware of the impact I have on others. It has made me more patient and thoughtful, which allows me to take feedback in new ways.

— Workshop participant

Profits from ACT go to benefit the innovative and life-saving work in science and medical communication that is continually being developed by the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University (Alda Center).

It was as if the three-hour improv session finally, after many years, broke something in my brain loose. I gave the best presentation I have ever given and felt very ‘present’ and in control as I gave it.

— William Gordon III, Chairman,
CEO and President, TetraGenetics Inc.

“There’s no failing in improvisation. In improv, what some people call failure is just the next step on the way to an interesting resolution.”

The workshop opened me up to the potential of listening ‘in the moment’ and on the other person’s terms, rather than simply listening for what I need.

— Workshop participant